Embers: One Ojibway’s Meditations by Richard Wagamese

Embers: One Ojibway’s Meditations  by Richard Wagamese

“In this carefully curated selection of everyday reflections, Richard Wagamese finds lessons in both the mundane and sublime as he muses on the universe, drawing inspiration from working in the bush—sawing and cutting and stacking wood for winter as well as the smudge ceremony to bring him closer to the Creator.” (Goodreads).

This is a really great book, full of all sorts of wonderful meditations. I like books like this because I can read just a page or two at a time and enjoy and meditate on the words. I enjoyed the author’s way with words, and how he explained things so beautifully. Wagamese is a Canadian author, and is one of Canada’s foremost authors and storytellers. The photographs in the book are beautiful (some taken by Wagamese himself), the cover is lovely; all around this is a book from which anyone could glean some wisdom as they take the time to meditate and think.

Wish I could include all of my favourite excerpts, but here are just a few:

…and there rises within you the notion that stillness is more enriching than motion, listening is more empowering than distraction and slow, measured steps feel more graceful than speed.” (p 26)

“We approach our lives on different trajectories, each of us spinning in our own separate, shining orbits. What gives this life its resonance is when those trajectories cross and we become engaged with each other, for as long or as fleetingly as we do…Every encounter has within it the power of enchantment, if we’re willing to look for it.” (p 38)

“Missing someone is feeling a piece of your heart gone astray. Sure, it keeps beating, and sure, you keep breathing, but there’s a gap in the rhythm of it, and in the rhythms of the everyday things around you. You seem to move a little less gracefully. But you still move, and that’s the critical thing…” (p 156)

*My progress for this Challenge is 9/13!!

 

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